LIB Lifts 2019

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The LIB sign in front of attendees flocking to the cool lake 

Almost no one could have predicted what began as a small birthday party for friends and family in Santa Barbara in 1999 with 1,200 people to balloon into one of California’s, and the world’s, most loved music and art festivals. It wasn’t until 2004 that people paid to attend, and more DJs and artists were recruited. The founders (the production company known now as The Do Lab) grew up going to Burning Man, and have been greatly influenced by that and their work with Coachella to mesh the corporate and off-the-grid worlds into a creative and like minded community. 

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Co-stage builder Alina poses in front of the Woogie stage

As co-founder Jesse Flemming said, “We now have a younger crowd, a Coachella college crowd, and that’s great, but we have to show them the way and address some of the issues of the world. That’s what sets LIB apart from other festivals. We have a 6 Ways of LIB code of conduct that we really push to teach people the ways that we wish to see and interact with the world. One of our major goals is to respect the land, and use sustainable workshops so that people can take this back to their everyday life after they leave the festival. We only allow 5% of our food vendors to sell meat to really highlight how big sustainability and climate change are for us. That’s the goal, for people to come here and have a reset from everyday life, to get away from their anxiety and politics and keep this energy as alive as possible throughout their lives.” 

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A sustainable food vendor hands out free Acai bowls that benefit an organization that fights climate change 

Indeed, LIB boasts some of the largest amounts of workshops of any festival in the U.S. besides Burning Man, covering everything from physical Kundalini yoga and breathwork to energy healing and massage; dietary classes such as plant-based Keto and others in the Learning Kitchen; ArtClave art classes, and many others. This is what makes LIB a ‘Transformative’ festival, as it’s more than just partying- rather it’s about growing your limitless potential and focusing on what you want to for yourself with the help of and connection to others. 

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A body paint artist works their magic 🙂

Speaking of connection with others, the entire vibe of the festival is a family one, and what it takes to run a festival often asks of people to give more than they have- this is how the Do Lab gets everything done so quickly between Coachella and LIB. Everyone works together to give their all, and even the founder’s parents help at LIB every year. “We have so many babies that are LIB babies- whose parents met at LIB through a magical connection. These are the types of stories that keep us going even in the chaos of creating a festival,” said Flemming. 

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Expert Kundalini teacher Jai Dev Sing teaches his ways

This year the festival was held at a new venue in Buena Vista Lake and also incorporated a new stage, which always poses challenges, but the team pulled it off gracefully. For many, this was their first LIB and they didn’t notice much of a difference, but others missed key LIB monuments from the past such as Meditation Mountain. Regardless, there was still a magical energy of play, as this new venue is typically a thriving park used by mostly families. Music headliners such as Flying Lotus, who used immersive 3D experiences during his set, in conjunction with the art and magic abound, made it an elevating weekend!

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Psy Trance DJ Khromata on the right breaks in the new Stacks stage

International Bamboo Bass: how Rodriguez has cultivated the Costa Rican techno scene through travel

One of the two gorgeous stages featured at Bamboo Bass:)
A Canadian artist showcasing his live painting at Bamboo Bass
Performers who accompanied musical acts with dancing, fire spinning, arial work, and more!

Bamboo Bass: a collective of artists and performers from all over the world celebrating bass and techhouse music in the paradise of Jaco, Costa Rica, located about 30 minutes inland in the heart of the jungle. From Canadian and Costa Rican production and artists to those from all over, this was a beautiful celebration in the jungle.

DJs Esteban et al under Puchero records
DJs Kevin York and Newball under Puchero records

One artist and her record label in particular caught our eye. Meli Rodriguez is a Costa Rican native, and the founder of Puchero Records, which works with not only Costa Rican artists, but those from all over the world. Not only is she an amazing DJ and advocate for women’s rights, but she is also a huge fan of traveling, filmmaker, producer, promoter, and web designer. Having lived in other countries such as Austria, Chile, and Spain, she experienced the techno scenes in these places and brought them back to create her own techno and electronic music scene in Costa Rica.

Meli Rodriguez bearing the symbol of her record label, a Pineapple 🙂

When living in Spain, she met her husband, and she came back to Costa Rica, and began to throw “formal” parties, and market towards a young audience, but soon she brought everyone into the mix. Soon enough, Puchero records has taken a stronghold in Costa Rica. Rodriguez recognizes the importance that music and art cultivates in people from different cultures and countries appreciating each other. In light of international women’s day, she says it is of upmost importance to “empower each other as much as possible”.

The Wynwood Art Murals on New Year’s Eve

A mural in the Wynwood Walls by popular artist Obey.

The Wynwood Walls in Miami are the brain child of Tony Goldman, and were created in 2009. Blocks and blocks of old warehouses and building spaces have been transformed into canvases for street and graffiti artists from all around the world.

Goldman references his friend Jeffery Deitch in calling this project a “Museum of the Streets”. The Wynwood Walls Program has seen over 50 artists representing over 16 countries.

Even outside of the designated project area, murals have become extremely popular, and make up a large portion of this area of Miami. They serve as a representation to Miami’s diverse culture and artistic prevalence.